The knots of galaxies formed from the Big Bang 200 million years ago can be solved! Now Saras gave this special information

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New Delhi. India’s SARAS Radio Telescope has helped scientists gather some information about the earliest stars and galaxies in the universe. This could solve many mysteries about the formation of galaxies after the Big Bang 200 million years ago, a period known as the cosmic dawn.

Findings published in Nature Astronomy by an international group of scientists have shown that radio telescopes provide an insight into the properties of early galaxies that are typically powered by supermassive black holes.

A team of scientists including Saurabh Singh from Bangalore-based Raman Research Institute (RRI) has estimated the energy output, luminosity and mass of the first generation of galaxies. The indigenously designed and built Background Radio Spectrum-3 (SARAS) telescope was deployed over the Dandiganahalli lake and Sharavati backwaters in northern Karnataka in early 2020.

In addition to RRI, researchers from Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), along with colleagues from the University of Cambridge and Tel Aviv University, studied the energy output, luminosity and mass of the first generation of galaxies that are bright at radio wavelengths. Participated in the study to estimate the mass.

During the research, the scientists experienced the radiation of hydrogen atoms in and around the galaxies emitted at a frequency of about 1420 MHz.

He explained that the radiation expands as the universe expands, as it travels around our space in time, and arrives on Earth in the form of the low-frequency radio band 50–200 MHz, which is used for FM and TV. is done by broadcasting.

The published findings showed that the cosmic signal is extremely faint, as the amount of luminous radiation from our own Milky Way has been reduced by man-made terrestrial interference, making it a challenge for astronomers to detect.

Explaining the findings of the research, Prof. Singh said SARAS-3 has improved astronomers’ understanding of the astrophysics of the cosmic dawn by revealing that less than three percent of the gaseous matter within early galaxies was converted into stars. It also showed that early galaxies were brighter in radio emission and stronger in X-rays, which heat up the cosmic gas in and around early galaxies.

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